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Polo Shirts, Jeans, Tennis Shoes are Changing American Fashion Clothing

 

In 1997, a retail entrepreneur named Chip Wilson in British Columbia was uncomfortable. So, he went to yoga classes like millions of other people in the world. In the first training, the most touching thing for Wilson was not the posture, it was the pants. He noticed Newchic Coupon that the yoga instructor wore tight-fitting clothes, reflecting his bodybuilding. Wilson was inspired by the second year that he started running yoga design and fashion business and opened his first store in Vancouver, Lululemon.
Historically, yoga has existed for more than 2,500 years, but from an economic point of view, Chip Wilson's 1997 class may be the most valuable yoga class. Over the past 20 years, Lululemon has set off a global fashion revolution that blurs the line between yoga and sporty clothing and general clothing. According to a survey, the proportion of high-income teenagers who are keen on sports and leisure stores such as Lululemon has increased six-fold in the past 10 years. (Strangely, sportswear is becoming more popular among teenagers, while at the same time, the participation of American teenagers in sports has declined significantly.)
As a person who does not participate in yoga or spinning classes, I have little interest in sportswear. I am a rather boring guy wearing jeans and a shirt. But for years, I have been thinking about what the rise of competitive sports brands tells. Yoga has existed for thousands of years, and elastic fabrics have existed for decades. How can the combination of the two suddenly burst into flames?
Deirdre Clemente, a fashion historian at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, knows it is the result of three long-term trends. First of all, the technological advancement of synthetic fibers makes products such as spandex more advantageous than natural materials. Secondly, modern people's persistence in health appearance makes yoga pants an effective carrier of “conspicuous consumption”. Finally, the fashion and office dress of the yoga studio The blur reflects the long-term decline of American fashion.
For Clemente, the history of sportswear did not begin with Lululemon in the late 20th century, but at the end of the 19th century, when the movement changed the way young people wore – both on the sports field and in the classroom.
In other words, when I asked Clemente to explain the sudden rise of sportswear, I didn't really know the impact of sportswear on the way Americans wore a long-term process. In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that all modern fashion is linked to sports and leisure clothing.
There are two reasons for the change that originated in the late 19th century.
In 1892, the American rubber company began to produce shoes with rubber soles, and the target consumers were athletes. Although the popularity of grass sports and tennis has been declining for decades, almost all of the best-selling shoes in the United States today are sports shoes. Like yoga pants, tennis shoes are also a sport that transcends sports.
Clemente told me that at the same time as the rubber soles were invented, sports began to rise in American universities. However, because there is not enough financial resources or the willingness to buy non-sportswear, many people can only wear sportswear to go to class.
Sportswear first appeared in Europe in the 19th century because they like to hunt or ride horses, but found it difficult to engage in these activities in a suit jacket. Young American students borrowed this style and made some adjustments, sometimes combining sports jackets with unsuitable pants for outdoor sports such as golf.
The "polo shirt" was originally called "tennis shirt". In the 1920s, the Frenchman Rene Lacoste was a Grand Slam tennis champion. He was dissatisfied with the typical long-sleeved sportswear of that era. To make it easier to run on the court, he designed a short-sleeved cotton shirt that unlocked the front part of the button and added a pulped collar to protect the players' necks from the sun. This shirt is very popular, and other companies such as Brooks Brothers in the UK have adopted a similar design for polo players. Today, Americans do not hesitate to use the term "polo shirt" to describe a daily dress, whose origins are like "yoga pants" and can be related to sports.
Clemente wrote in "Dress Casual" that shorts may be the most popular style in sportswear. Shorts were just sportswear at first, but older people were too disgusted with the clothes. In 1930, a group of newspaper editors at Dartmouth College organized a school-wide shorts protest, calling on men to “enjoy the full freedom of the legs,” and later, by the middle of the century. Shorts are almost everywhere on the streets.
Sportswear is equally revolutionary for women. In the past, Europe had to be shackled, East Asia was bound to foot, and a woman’s fashion history was filled with the constraints of male eccentric aesthetics.
For most of the 19th century, female athletes wore long skirts on the court and on the court. Bicycles were popular throughout the country in the 1890s. For women, wearing a long skirt that may be entangled in spokes is difficult and dangerous to ride, which has led to a more reasonable appeal to modern life.
Fashion companies are gradually offering more "dynamic" clothing to young female athletes, including short skirts with button-down tops. More revolutionary is the separate skirts, pants, and even shorts, which allows women to ride bicycles safely. But even in the 1950s, Clemente found that schools such as Pennsylvania State University tried to limit the time and place to wear women's shorts.
The rise of sweatshirts was also related to the campus movement at the end of the 19th century, and it became a popular attire – and cultural critics lamented the popularity of sweatshirts among women. The first modern sportswear (similar to the animal skin that is worn for warmth) is essentially a sweater worn by male athletes of the rowing team or the golf team to sweat and lose weight. On campus, these young men—and soon, young women—may have put on sweaters to show that they are involved in campus sports. However, the sweater is too comfortable, not only limited to sports, so the students began to wear sweaters everywhere. Like the yoga pants of a century later, the use of sweaters is constantly evolving. Initially, it was about sports, but it quickly became an appreciation of an active lifestyle.
Not everyone accepts such a change. In 1936, a columnist in Esquire wrote: "Women wear sports shorts and sweatshirts and run and jump in track and field competitions, not only wasting their time, but also wasting us." Still, In the past 80 years, shorts have become shorter and tighter, as advances in materials such as synthetic fibers have made the pants more flexible and more comfortable.
In the last century, the driving force of Western fashion change was mainly to use clothes designed for an event for other occasions. For decades, Levi Strauss' jeans were mostly worn by men working in factories and farms, but now they are worn by lazy people; watches are invented to keep soldiers punctual during the war, to some extent today. Become a symbol of identity.
After talking to Deirdre Clemente, I opened my closet and saw my three polo shirts, four shorts, two jeans, five sweaters, four pairs of tennis shoes and three sports jackets.

POLO shirts, jeans, tennis shoes: changing American fashion clothing
In 1997, a retail entrepreneur named Chip Wilson in British Columbia was uncomfortable. So, he went to yoga classes like millions of other people in the world. In the first training, the most touching thing for Wilson was not the posture, it was the pants. He noticed that the yoga instructor wore tight-fitting clothes, reflecting his bodybuilding. Wilson was inspired by the second year that he started running yoga design and fashion business and opened his first store in Vancouver, Lululemon.
Historically, yoga has existed for more than 2,500 years, but from an economic point of view, Chip Wilson's 1997 class may be the most valuable yoga class. Over the past 20 years, Lululemon has set off a global fashion revolution that blurs the line between yoga and sporty clothing and general clothing. According to a survey, the proportion of high-income teenagers who are keen on sports and leisure stores such as Lululemon has increased six-fold in the past 10 years. (Strangely, sportswear is becoming more popular among teenagers, while at the same time, the participation of American teenagers in sports has declined significantly.)
As a person who does not participate in yoga or spinning classes, I have little interest in sportswear. I am a rather boring guy wearing jeans and a shirt. But for years, I have been thinking about what the rise of competitive sports brands tells. Yoga has existed for thousands of years, and elastic fabrics have existed for decades. How can the combination of the two suddenly burst into flames?
Deirdre Clemente, a fashion historian at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, knows it is the result of three long-term trends. First of all, the technological advancement of synthetic fibers makes products such as spandex more advantageous than natural materials. Secondly, modern people's persistence in health appearance makes yoga pants an effective carrier of “conspicuous consumption”. Finally, the fashion and office dress of the yoga studio The blur reflects the long-term decline of American fashion.
For Clemente, the history of sportswear did not begin with Lululemon in the late 20th century, but at the end of the 19th century, when the movement changed the way young people wore – both on the sports field and in the classroom.
In other words, when I asked Clemente to explain the sudden rise of sportswear, I didn't really know the impact of sportswear on the way Americans wore a long-term process. In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that all modern fashion is linked to sports and leisure clothing.
There are two reasons for the change that originated in the late 19th century.
In 1892, the American rubber company began to produce shoes with rubber soles, and the target consumers were athletes. Although the popularity of grass sports and tennis has been declining for decades, almost all of the best-selling shoes in the United States today are sports shoes. Like yoga pants, tennis shoes are also a sport that transcends sports.
Clemente told me that at the same time as the rubber soles were invented, sports began to rise in American universities. However, because there is not enough financial resources or the willingness to buy non-sportswear, many people can only wear sportswear to go to class.
Sportswear first appeared in Europe in the 19th century because they like to hunt or ride horses, but found it difficult to engage in these activities in a suit jacket. Young American students borrowed this style and made some adjustments, sometimes combining sports jackets with unsuitable pants for outdoor sports such as golf.
The "polo shirt" was originally called "tennis shirt". In the 1920s, the Frenchman Rene Lacoste was a Grand Slam tennis champion. He was dissatisfied with the typical long-sleeved sportswear of that era. To make it easier to run on the court, he designed a short-sleeved cotton shirt that unlocked the front part of the button and added a pulped collar to protect the players' necks from the sun. This shirt is very popular, and other companies such as Brooks Brothers in the UK have adopted a similar design for polo players. Today, Americans do not hesitate to use the term "polo shirt" to describe a daily dress, whose origins are like "yoga pants" and can be related to sports.
Clemente wrote in "Dress Casual" that shorts may be the most popular style in sportswear. Shorts were just sportswear at first, but older people were too disgusted with the clothes. In 1930, a group of newspaper editors at Dartmouth College organized a school-wide shorts protest, calling on men to “enjoy the full freedom of the legs,” and later, by the middle of the century. Shorts are almost everywhere on the streets.
Sportswear is equally revolutionary for women. In the past, Europe had to be shackled, East Asia was bound to foot, and a woman’s fashion history was filled with the constraints of male eccentric aesthetics.
For most of the 19th century, female athletes wore long skirts on the court and on the court. Bicycles were popular throughout the country in the 1890s. For women, wearing a long skirt that may be entangled in spokes is difficult and dangerous to ride, which has led to a more reasonable appeal to modern life.
Fashion companies are gradually offering more "dynamic" clothing to young female athletes, including short skirts with button-down tops. More revolutionary is the separate skirts, pants, and even shorts, which allows women to ride bicycles safely. But even in the 1950s, Clemente found that schools such as Pennsylvania State University tried to limit the time and place to wear women's shorts.
The rise of sweatshirts was also related to the campus movement at the end of the 19th century, and it became a popular attire – and cultural critics lamented the popularity of sweatshirts among women. The first modern sportswear (similar to the animal skin that is worn for warmth) is essentially a sweater worn by male athletes of the rowing team or the golf team to sweat and lose weight. On campus, these young men—and soon, young women—may have put on sweaters to show that they are involved in campus sports. However, the sweater is too comfortable, not only limited to sports, so the students began to wear sweaters everywhere. Like the yoga pants of a century later, the use of sweaters is constantly evolving. Initially, it was about sports, but it quickly became an appreciation of an active lifestyle.
Not everyone accepts such a change. In 1936, a columnist in Esquire wrote: "Women wear sports shorts and sweatshirts and run and jump in track and field competitions, not only wasting their time, but also wasting us." Still, In the past 80 years, shorts Dacoz have become shorter and tighter, as advances in materials such as synthetic fibers have made the pants more flexible and more comfortable.
In the last century, the driving force of Western fashion change was mainly to use clothes designed for an event for other occasions. For decades, Levi Strauss' jeans were mostly worn by men working in factories and farms, but now they are worn by lazy people; watches are invented to keep soldiers punctual during the war, to some extent today. Become a symbol of identity.
After talking to Deirdre Clemente, I opened my closet and saw my three polo shirts, four shorts, two jeans, five sweaters, four pairs of tennis shoes and three sports jackets.

07 ноября 2018 14:58

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